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A History of Innovation

Pierre Lorilleux1818

Lorilleux is founded

One of the first commercial producers of inks is founded as Lorilleux & Cie. Lorilleux & Cie is the first specialty ink company of its kind, in a time when most printers make their own inks.

1830

The Geo. H. Morrill Company

Samuel Morrill begins manufacturing printing inks in the kitchen of his Andover, Massachusetts, home.

1853

Morrill Company obtains patent

The Morrill Company obtains the first patent on their ink-making process.

1864

The introduction of carbon black

The Morrill Company begins producing carbon black from natural gas.

1877

Coates Brothers & Company is founded

Located in London, the business is capitalized at 2600 £.

1878

Ault & Wiborg is founded

Located in Cincinnati, Ohio, Ault & Wiborg is a fast-growing printing inks manufacturer that quickly expands its business abroad, focusing on the UK market.

1906

Four-color process debuts

The Eagle Printing Ink Company develops four-color wet process inks.

1907

The first litho press is invented

Fuchs & Lang build the first rotary tinplate lithography press. G. Siegle begins manufacturing pigments in Staten Island, NY.

1910

Rotogravure is introduced

Rotogravure, a printing process in which letters and pictures are transferred from an etched copper cylinder to a web of paper, plastic or similar material in a rotary press, is invented.

1929

Historic mergers

A.B. Ansbacher merges with G. Siegle and the Ansbacher-Siegle Company is formed. During the same year, The Morrill Company merges with Eagle, Sigmund Ullman, Fuchs & Lang and American to form General Printing Ink (GPI). GPI becomes the first ink manufacturer with coast-to-coast operations.

1930s

Letterpress become popular

Letterpress, the process of printing from a raised ink surface, becomes the major web printing process.

1935

Notable acquisition

GPI Corporation acquires Sun Chemical and Colors of Harrison, NJ.

1936

Pigmented flexo Inks

GPI Corp’s Sun Chemical division develops the first pigmented flexo inks.

SunChemical1945

GPI becomes Sun Chemical

GPI changes its name and Sun Chemical is born. Printing inks remain its principal business.

1947

Web offset lithography is born

Web offset lithography, which works by first transferring an image photographically to ink printing plates, is pioneered.

1957

Performance Pigments division is formed

Sun Chemical acquires Ansbacher-Siegle and begins to create a new division, known today as Performance Pigments.

12_history_19581958

Solvent-based flexo inks are introduced

Solvent-based flexo inks are created for use on polyethylene films.

1966

Quinacridone is manufactured

Sun Chemical begins to manufacture quinacridone out of its Newark, New Jersey, facility, marking the company’s entry into the high-performance pigments market.’

1968

Federal Colors Laboratories is acquired

Sun Chemical buys Federal Color Labs in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The first UV inks

Sun Chemical patents the first UV inks.

1970

Water-based inks are created

The first water-based inks are introduced for use on paper and film.

1978

Pigment manufacturing begins

Sun Chemical begins to manufacture pigments in Muskegon, Michigan.

1980

EB inks go commercial

Sun Chemical commercializes EB inks. In the same year, they acquire the phthalo pigment business from American Cyanamid.

12_history_DIC_web1987

Sun Chemical grows

Sun Chemical is acquired by Dainippon Ink and Chemicals (DIC). Sun Chemical also merges with Hartmann and Kohl & Madden to form one global company.

1991

BASF is acquired

Sun Chemical buys the BASF packaging and commercial inks business.

1992

UV flexo inks go commercial

The first UV flexo inks are commercialized by Sun Chemical. In the same year, Sun Chemical acquires KVK in Koge, Denmark, marking the company’s first step into European pigment manufacturing.

1993

US Ink is acquired

Sun Chemical acquires a top producer of cold-set publication inks, United States Printing Inks.

1994

Moscow Inks is bought out

Sun Chemical acquires Moscow Printing Inks.

1996

Zeneca Inks is acquired

Sun Chemical strengthens their packaging inks department in North America with the acquisition of Zeneca Specialty Inks.

1997

Sun Chemical enters joint venture

Sun Chemical and Eastman Kodak enter a $1 billion, 50/50 joint venture to form Kodak Polychrome Graphics.

1999

Sun Chemical grows globally

The company acquires Coates Lorilleux in France, SWALE Process in the UK and GB Products International Flexo Plate Division, and partners with Tintas in Latin America.

2003

Bayer Pigments is acquired

Sun Chemical buys Bayer’s high-performance organic pigment business.

2004

More acquisitions and growth

Sun Chemical acquires Rycoline Products, Inc. and buys the assets of CBS Printas, the printing ink business of CBS Holding, a publicly traded company in Turkey.

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2006

Sun Branding Solutions ifs formed

Sun Chemical acquires Watt Gilchrist and forms Sun Branding Solutions.

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2010

Frankfurt and Dahej packaging plant

Sun Chemical opens state-of-the-art food packaging plant in Frankfurt and sheet-fed ink hub in Dahej, India.

2011

Kankakee packaging plant

Sun Chemical opens state-of-the-art packaging plant in Kankakee, IL, and expands into high definition plate technology in Concord, CA.

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2012

PantoneLIVE ™ and Benda-Lutz

Partnership with X-Rite/Pantone and Esko on PantoneLIVETM Sun Chemical acquires Benda-Lutz.

The Future

As Sun Chemical moves forward, we will continue our commitment to delivering quality, service and innovation to our customers. As we relentlessly seek the most inventive ways to satisfy our customers’ needs, we will strive to provide outstanding service and breakthrough, tailored solutions. With more than 250 locations worldwide and a broad breadth and depth of resources from which to draw, Sun Chemical is prepared to help our customers take on the global challenges of tomorrow.